CHEM 30B Dr. R. Rinehart
Quiz 10 Study Guide
Aerobic Metabolism

 BE ABLE TO:

 DEFINE: metabolism, anabolism, catabolism, metabolic pathway

OUTLINE the three stages of catabolism

RECOGNIZE and/or EXEMPLIFY the four patterns of metabolic pathways

DIAGRAM and LABEL a mitochondrion

DEFINE: energy

STATE: the different forms in which energy is found

EXPLAIN why living cells need energy

DESCRIBE the role of ATP in cellular energy transfer

EXPLAIN the structural basis of “high-energy” bonds

PROVIDE several alternative definitions for oxidation and reduction

STATE the different forms in which “H2” can be found

ASSOCIATE redox coenzymes with the form of “H2 they can accept/donate

RECOGNIZE the structures of: NAD+ and NADH, FAD and FADH2, CoQ and CoQH2, heme and hemin, CoA, ATP, ADP, and AMP

DIAGRAM:  the electron transport system and the ATP synthase

STATE the major components of each ETS complex and the ATP synthase

STATE the substrates feeding electrons to the ETS and where each feeds in

EXPLAIN the way in which energy liberated by electron transport is captured and used to drive ATP synthesis 

take a look at http://www.hbcollege.com/chem/biochem/GarrettGrisham/Animations/OxidativePhosphorylation.html 

STATE the ATP yield from oxidative phosphorylation for: NADH, FADH2, CoQH2

DESCRIBE the way in which the rate of electron transport is controlled

WRITE IN SEQUENCE the names of the substrates and enzymes of the Krebs cycle

RECOGNIZE the structures of each Krebs cycle intermediate

STATE the number of C in each Krebs intermediate

IDENTIFY the steps in the Krebs cycle where:

            dehydrogenation takes place [and IDENTIFY which coenzyme gets reduced]
           
substrate-level phosphorylation occurs
           
CO2 is produced
           
HSCoA is needed

STATE: the coenzymes required by the aKG dehydrogenase complex

DESCRIBE the importance and significance of acetyl-CoA in metabolism

IDENTIFY the major rate-controlling enzymes of the Krebs cycle

DESCRIBE how the rate of the Krebs cycle is normally controlled

UNDERSTAND and APPRECIATE how these “final common pathways” interconnect with other metabolic processes
 
© Ronald W. Rinehart, 2002